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Mid-America Transportation Center

Validation on the Mechanical Models of Asphalt Pavement Structures with Field Measured Data Associated with Increasing Freight Movements

Final Report
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University

Missouri University of Science & Technology

Researchers

  • Principal Investigator: Yu-Ning Ge (geyun@mst.edu 573-341-7193)
  • Graduate Students
  • Sitenikechukwu Onyejekwe
  • Iana Muchaidze
  • Iana Muchaidze
  • Project Status
    Complete
  • Start Date: 7/1/2008
  • End Date: 8/31/2010
  • Sponsors & Partners
  • Mid-America Transportation Center
  • Missouri University of Science & Technology
  • About this Project
    Brief Project Description & Background
    This proposed study is aimed at better understanding the effects of heavy trucks on the performance of asphalt pavements. Sufficient field performance data will be collected in this study; they will be used to validate the Mechanistic Empirical Pavement Design Guide (MEPDG) and the finite element method (FEM) in terms of the impact of heavy truck loading on pavement performance. Findings from this study will provide necessary information for the development of next-generation mechanics-rigorous MEPDG.
    Research Objective
    Several target roadway sections will be selected in Missouri as test sites. Critical data related to pavement performance will be collected from the select sections, including truck loading data, material properties, pavement geometry, and environmental condition. To develop a credible FEM of the select roadway sections, ultimate validations of the FEM will be conducted using the damage data of the pavement structures taken from the recently developed coaxial cable sensors. The MEPDG analysis will be performed for each of the select pavement sections and A FEM will be established for each of the select roadway sections.
    Potential Benefits
    Better understanding of the effects of heavy truck loads on the overall structural performance and life of pavements. More appropriate implementation of the MEPDG into pavement designs with further research issues identified. Potential development of a damage detection method using the distributed coaxial cable sensors recently invented by the Co-PI's research group. The proposed effort will form the basis for practical applications to better perform structural analysis and life prediction of pavement systems. The successful completion of this research can therefore advance the current pavement design and analysis techniques.
    Abstract
    This proposed study is aimed at better understanding the effects of heavy trucks on the performance of asphalt pavements. As the U.S. freight movements are dominated by truck transportations, the addition of new roadway lane-miles in Region VII has never been kept in pace with the increased truck volumes. As such, existing highway pavements must be effectively preserved under heavy truck loads. The key to the success of infrastructure preservation is to model the behavior of pavement structures accurately. To this end, sufficient field performance data will be collected in this study; they will be used to validate the Mechanistic Empirical Pavement Design Guide (MEPDG) and the finite element method (FEM) in terms of the impact of heavy truck loading on pavement performance. Actual roadway sections in Missouri and Nebraska will be selected and monitored several times over the period of the project. Pavement performance-related data such as traffic information, asphalt material properties, and subgrade condition will be collected and used for various analyses. The proposed study will likely provide insights on effective implementation of the MEPDG into the design and analysis of pavements in Region VII. Findings from this study will provide necessary information for the development of next-generation mechanics-rigorous MEPDG. The outcomes of this study will lead to better understanding of the pavement structure designs which can result in a long-lasting transportation infrastructure and improve public safety. The proposed study will be completed in close coordination with Professor Yong-Rak Kim from the University of Nebraska-Lincoln through a parallel study that has been separately proposed by Dr. Kim.
    Total Project Cost
    $ 147,414
    Modal Orientation
  • Concrete and Pavements
  • Structures