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Mid-America Transportation Center

Initial Study and Verification of a Distributed Fiber Optic Corrosion Monitoring System for Transportation Structures

Final Report
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Researchers

  • Principal Investigator: Hai Xiao (xiaoha@mst.edu 573-341-6887)
  • Co-Principal Investigator: Genda Chen (gchen@mst.edu (573) 341-4462)
  • Graduate Students
  • Ying Huang
  • Dongming Yan
  • Project Status
    Complete
    Sponsors & Partners
  • CISL-PRS(Israel)
  • Missouri University of Science & Technology
  • Center for Infrastructure Engineering Studies
  • About this Project
    Brief Project Description & Background
    Corrosion has long been recognized as one of the major contributors to catastrophic failure of transportation structures. Cost-effective technologies for large-scale transportation structures are basically unavailable. A recent study by Koch et al.. (2002) indicated that the annual direct cost for the corrosion-related maintenance of US highway bridges was estimated to be $8.3 billion [1]. This proposal aims to develop a novel, distributed fiber optic corrosion monitoring system for long-term deterioration assessment of bridges. Core to the monitoring system is a novel corrosion sensor that can be made by coating a thin layer of iron-epoxy around the surface of an optical fiber inscribed with a long period fiber grating (LPFG). Due to its coupling effect with strain and the need for monitoring of the corrosion environment (e.g. pH and temperature) in practical applications, a polymer-coated LPFG sensor and an uncoated LPFG sensor will be integrated with the corrosion sensor to form a multiplexed, self-referencing monitoring system. The proposed study will focus on the design, characterization, integration and demonstration of the triple-sensor monitoring system. Two reinforced concrete (RC) blocks will be used to test and demonstrate the feasibility of the above monitoring system towards practical applications.
    Research Objective
    The objective is to develop a novel, distributed fiber optic corrosion monitoring system for long-term deterioration assessment of bridges.
    Potential Benefits
    The proposed research will lead to the development of a comprehensive, distributed corrosion monitoring system that provides the important information on corrosion, corrosion environment and its implication on structural health/safety. Such information is critical for the assessment of corrosion-induced structural deterioration and the timely preventive actions taken against a catastrophic failure in order to ensure the safe and smooth operation of our nation's transportation structures.
    Abstract
    Corrosion has long been recognized as one of the major contributors to catastrophic failure of transportation structures. Except for qualitative nondestructive evaluation techniques, corrosion monitoring and assessment has been limited to a few isolated studies with point sensors. Cost-effective technologies for large-scale transportation structures are basically unavailable. This proposal aims to develop a novel, distributed fiber optic corrosion monitoring system for long-term deterioration assessment of bridges. Core to the monitoring system is a novel corrosion sensor that can be made by coating a thin layer of iron-epoxy around the surface of an optical fiber inscribed with a long period fiber grating (LPFG). Our preliminary results have shown that an iron epoxy coated LPFG sensor could effectively detect the corrosion process of iron particles, and thus of the nearby steel rebar or member. Due to its coupling effect with strain and the need for monitoring of the corrosion environment (e.g. pH and temperature) in practical applications, a polymer-coated LPFG sensor and an uncoated LPFG sensor will be integrated with the corrosion sensor to form a multiplexed, self-referencing monitoring system. The proposed study will focus on the design, characterization, integration and demonstration of the triple-sensor monitoring system. Two reinforced concrete (RC) blocks will be used to test and demonstrate the feasibility of the above monitoring system towards practical applications.
    Project Amount
    $ 92,225
    Modal Orientation
  • Structures
  • Technology Transfer Activities
    Corrosion has long been recognized as one of the major contributors to catastrophic failure of transportation structures. Cost-effective technologies for large-scale transportation structures are basically unavailable. A recent study by Koch et al.. (2002) indicated that the annual direct cost for the corrosion-related maintenance of US highway bridges was estimated to be $8.3 billion [1]. This proposal aims to develop a novel, distributed fiber optic corrosion monitoring system for long-term deterioration assessment of bridges. Core to the monitoring system is a novel corrosion sensor that can be made by coating a thin layer of iron-epoxy around the surface of an optical fiber inscribed with a long period fiber grating (LPFG). Due to its coupling effect with strain and the need for monitoring of the corrosion environment (e.g. pH and temperature) in practical applications, a polymer-coated LPFG sensor and an uncoated LPFG sensor will be integrated with the corrosion sensor to form a multiplexed, self-referencing monitoring system. The proposed study will focus on the design, characterization, integration and demonstration of the triple-sensor monitoring system. Two reinforced concrete (RC) blocks will be used to test and demonstrate the feasibility of the above monitoring system towards practical applications.