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Mid-America Transportation Center

Safety Investigation and Guidance for Work-Zone Devices in Freight Transportation Systems Subjected to Passenger Car and Truck Impacts with New Crash Standards

Final Report
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Researchers

  • Principal Investigator: Ronald Faller (rfaller1@unl.edu 402-472-6864)
  • Co-Principal Investigator: Karla Polivka 402-472-9070)
  • Co-Principal Investigator: James Holloway 402-450-6250)
  • Project Status
    Complete
    Sponsors & Partners
  • Dicke Tool Company
  • Mid-America Transportation Center
  • About this Project
    Brief Project Description & Background
    This research study will determine whether typical work-zone devices will provide acceptable safety performance when impacted by a broader range in vehicle class, or when using the MASH 2008 guidelines.
    Research Objective
    The objective is to determine whether typical work-zone devices will provide acceptable safety performance when impacted by a broader range in vehicle class, or when using the MASH 2008 guidelines. In addition, guidance will be provided for evaluating future work-zone devices.
    Potential Benefits
    The final report will include guidance for future testing of work-zone devices or existing safety performance of selected work-zone devices in terms of new MASH 2008 standards. The results will provide guidance as to which temporary sign stand configurations may be more at risk for penetrating the occupant compartments for a larger range of passenger vehicles versus those that may be only at risk for one vehicle class (i.e., small car).
    Abstract
    The guidelines established in National Cooperative Highway Research Program (NCHRP) Report 350 and the Manual for Assessing Safety Hardware (MASH) for the safety performance evaluation of work-zone devices were discussed. Work-zone sign supports previously tested with NCHRP Report 350 were evaluated and analyzed to determine if they would be acceptable under the MASH safety performance criteria. Eight full-scale tests were conducted on previously FHWA-accepted work-zone sign supports. Five of the work-zone sign supports performed unsatisfactorily according to MASH. The test results were then compared to predicted behavior and, when necessary, the predictions were revised. Recommendations were then made that should help manufacturers to design and highway engineers to select work-zone sign support systems that are likely to provide safe impact performance for a wide range of passenger vehicles
    Project Amount
    $ 60,000
    Modal Orientation
  • Freight
  • Highways
  • Multimodal Transportation
  • Safety and Human Performance
  • Work Zones