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Mid-America Transportation Center

NDOR Effectiveness Study on Temporary Pavement Marking Removal Methods

Final Report
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Researchers

  • Principal Investigator: Yong Kwon Cho (ycho2@unl.edu 402-554-3277)
  • Project Status
    Complete
    Sponsors & Partners
  • Nebraska Department of Roads
  • About this Project
    Brief Project Description & Background
    Traditionally, to judge the quality of hot-mix asphalt, in-place density is measured by determining the density of cores cut from the newly compacted pavement, or by the use of nuclear gauge. Core densities are typically believed to provide the most accurate results, but this process is destructive to the newly compacted pavement. Nuclear technology offers a non-destructive method for density measurements, but is burdened with high costs and intense regulations associated with training and certifications for technicians, along with licensing, storage, special handling, and shipping of hazardous materials. Similarly, soil density and moisture content are two essential properties in the quality control and quality assurance of projects that involve soil compaction, but the measurement methods of sand cone or water balloon for soil density and oven drying for moisture content are destructive and time consuming. The goal of the research is to assist the Nebraska Department of Roads (NDOR) with supporting technical data in order to adopt non-nuclear gauges as a test modality for assessing HMA pavement and in-place soil.
    Research Objective
    The objectives of this research are: 1) To assess the effect of a considerable number of factors potentially affecting the density and moisture measurements generated by non-nuclear gauges on HMA and soil compared to the nuclear gauge and core/soil samples through intensive field and lab tests. 2) To investigate economical alternatives, such as trade-in, for replacing the current NDOR nuclear gauges to minimize NDOR’s cost burden.
    Potential Benefits
    This research will provide data to help move toward adoption of non-nuclear, non-destructive methods of hot-mix asphalt testing. This will circumvent the need to destroy new pavement with coring and will provide a less expensive, simpler, more user-friendly method than nuclear testing.
    Abstract
    In-place density is a key indicator used to judge the quality of hot-mix asphalt (HMA) pavements. Traditionally, this property has been measured by determining the density of cores cut, or by the use of nuclear gauge. Core densities are typically believed to provide the most accurate results, but this process is destructive to the newly compacted pavement. Also concerns have been expressed regarding the accuracy of core method, especially for coarse-graded and large nominal aggregate size (NMAS) mixes. Soil density and moisture content are two essential properties in the quality control and quality assurance of projects that involve soil compaction. However, current field practices either are destructive and time-consuming, sand cone or water balloon for soil density and oven drying for moisture content. Nuclear technology offers a non-destructive method for density measurements, but is burdened with high costs and intense regulations associated with training and certifications for technicians, semi-annual leak tests, yearly verifications, and bi-annual calibrations; along with licensing, storage , special handling, and shipping of hazardous materials. The goal of the research is to assist the Nebraska Department of Roads (NDOR) with supporting technical data in order to adopt non-nuclear gauges as a test modality for assessing HMA pavement and in-place soil. As a step toward this goal, the objectives of this research are: 1) To assess the effect of a considerable number of factors potentially affecting the density and moisture measurements generated by non-nuclear gauges on HMA and soil compared to the nuclear gauge and core/soil samples through intensive field and lab tests. 2) To investigate economical alternatives, such as trade-in, for replacing the current NDOR nuclear gauges to minimize NDOR’s cost burden.
    Project Amount
    $ 94,672
    Modal Orientation
  • Highways