Skip Navigation

Mid-America Transportation Center

Evaluation of Low-Cost Intersection Countermeasures to Reduce Red Light Running Violations

Final Report
click to download report


Researchers

  • Principal Investigator: Sunanda Dissanayake (sunanda@ksu.edu 785-532-1540)
  • Co-Principal Investigator: Steven Schrock (schrock@ku.edu (785) 864-3418)
  • Project Status
    Complete
    About this Project
    Brief Project Description & Background
    Red light running (RLR) crashes are a serious safety concern at signalized intersections. Many communities have installed automated enforcement as a way to enforce red light violations at high-crash intersections. However, automated enforcement may not always be practical for an intersection or cannot be implemented due to state legislation. Many communities have implemented low-cost countermeasures at intersections (e.g. confirmation lights, reflective back plates, advance beacons, or enhanced signage) to alert the driver or aid law enforcement officials in capturing violators. For this analysis, a before and after reduction or increase in red light running violations will be used as a surrogate measure to crash data to evaluate red light running countermeasures and the spillover effect at select intersections in Kansas. The results of this research study is expected to have an immediate impact in the State of Kansas with legislation preventing automated enforcement to be installed and communities seeking low-cost ways to reduce red light running at signalized intersections.
    Research Objective
    The primary objective of this study is to evaluate various available low-cost red light running contermeasures and then to evaluate the effectiveness of the most suitable selected countermeasure at signalized intersections in Kansas.
    Potential Benefits
    It is expected that this project will be highly publicized and visible within the communities selected for intersection evaluation. It is expected that a reduction in RLR violations will occur as a result of this project. It is also expected that an excellent collaboration effort by the research team and communities selected will also be a result of the project. Finally, it is expected that this project will be of interest to many large communities in the State of Kansas who are trying to implement low-cost strategies to reduce red light running violations with Kansas law that makes automated enforcement illegal.
    Abstract
    Red light running (RLR) crashes are a serious safety concern at signalized intersections. In 2009 it was reported that 676 fatalities (FHWA, 2011) and 130,000 injuries were due to red light running crashes in the United States (IIHS, 2011). The Insurance Institute for Highway Safety (IIHS) reported that in 2007 over half of the red lights running fatalities were passengers of the violating vehicle, both passengers and the driver of the vehicle that was collided into, or pedestrians within the intersection (IIHS, 2007). Many communities have installed automated enforcement as a way to enforce red light violations at high-crash intersections. In 2011, it was estimated that over 538 communities had installed automated enforcement (IIHS, 2011). However, automated enforcement may not be practical for an intersection or cannot be implemented due to state legislation. Many communities have implemented low-cost countermeasures at intersections (e.g. confirmation lights, reflective back plates, advance beacons, or enhanced signage) to alert the driver or aid law enforcement officials in capturing violators.

    Limited research currently exists on evaluating low-cost red light running countermeasures beyond naive before and after crash analysis in response to community pressure. To fully evaluate a countermeasure, typically 3 to 6 years of before and after crash data are required, which may not always be feasible. For this analysis, a before and after reduction or increase in red light running violations will be used as a surrogate measure to crash data to evaluate red light running countermeasures and the spillover effect at select intersections in Kansas. The results of this research study is expected to have an immediate impact in the State of Kansas with legislation preventing automated enforcement to be installed and communities seeking low-cost ways to reduce red light running at signalized intersections.
    Project Amount
    $ 60,917